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AUSTIN-HEALEY 100/6 BN4L

FACTS

1956-1957

CONSTRUCTION YEAR

GERRY COKER

DESIGNERS

6 cylinders

2,631 cc

102 hp

ENGINE

7.053

NUMBER OF PIECES

1957

austinhealeybn7-12.jpg

STORY

The Austin-Healey BN6 is a roadster produced in the 1950s and 1960s by the British car brand Austin-Healey. The BN6 belongs to the Austin-Healey 100/6 model series, which was produced between 1956 and 1959.

The Austin-Healey BN6 was first introduced in 1958 as a continuation of the successful Austin-Healey 100 series. The model was a two-seater roadster with a 2.6-litre six-cylinder engine that offered considerable power for the time. The "BN" in the name stood for "Big Healey" and indicated that it was a larger version of the Austin-Healey 100.

The vehicle was developed by the renowned British automobile designer Donald Healey, in collaboration with the BMC (British Motor Corporation). The Austin-Healey BN6 was offered as an open roadster with a lightweight soft top and was known for its sporty design and impressive driving performance.

With its powerful engine and distinctive front end, the Austin-Healey BN6 attracted many automobile enthusiasts. The vehicle's performance and agile handling made it a popular vehicle both on the racetrack and on the road.

However, the production time of the Austin-Healey BN6 was relatively short, as the Austin-Healey 3000 series was introduced in 1959.

Today, Austin-Healey cars, including the BN6, are highly sought-after collector's items. Their classic lines, hand-crafted craftsmanship and historical significance make them sought-after vintage cars for lovers of classic British sports cars.

PERSONAL STORY

This Healey is one of the last to be built at the original factory in Longbridge.

From there, his very international journey began. His first stop was sunny California, where he spent many hours on sunny trips until 1995.

Murray Scott Nelson brought it back to England and restored it with great attention to originality and attention to detail.

Even though the temperatures were a bit colder than in California, it was nice to bring this classic back to its homeland.

But as soon as the restoration was completed, it came to Ireland in 1997, where it remained for over two decades. With this same owner, it then moved to Austria to the beautiful Wolfgangsee about 15 years ago and one day visited the Manro Classic Museum, where it has been adding to the collection of British classics for a few years now.

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